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They stand on uneven ground..

"The stand on uneven ground, and form a small wood. Of the oldest and best looking trees, I counted eleven or twelve; twenty five very large ones; about fifty of middling size; and more than three hundred smaller and young one. The trunks of the old trees are covered with names of travelers and other persons who have visited them. I saw a date of the seventeenth century. The trunks of the oldest trees seem to be quite dead; the wood is of grey tint; I took off a piece of one them; but it was afterwards stolen." 

John Lewis Burkhardt (1784-1817)

(via beirut_gallery : roberto boccaccino)
'On The Side' photo essay by Roberto Boccaccino:
‘ON THE SIDE
People who know or live in Beirut consider it as a place in which a new, and sometimes imminent, conflict is always drawing.
This uncertainty, this faint stability, does not prove to place a check on progress and life but, as it was completely absorbed by the people who experience it, becomes the raw material, the fuel through which the city burns and and builds the present.
Beirut is a city that lives on present, and it’s in the present that it seems to project itself. It’s probably a short-term but, at the same time, very solid projection.The pursuit of immediate fullness is evident everywhere, in the uninterrupted urban growth, in the economic and cultural boosts and, of course, in the youth-life, constantly in search for emancipation, amusement, fulfillment. There is no doubt that the city (probably the most open-minded city of the Middle East) offers the possibility to satisfy all that.
These images portray everything that stands on the side of this fullness, this burning without wearing out, on the side of parties excesses and nightlife, of daytime progress and development.
The images are part of a broader research about a suspended generation, its choices and outlooks. An intimate research that uses time and space by laying them aside, in the attempt to portray feelings and atmospheres, void and inadequacies, reality and visions.’

(via beirut_gallery : roberto boccaccino)

'On The Side' photo essay by Roberto Boccaccino:

ON THE SIDE

People who know or live in Beirut consider it as a place in which a new, and sometimes imminent, conflict is always drawing.

This uncertainty, this faint stability, does not prove to place a check on progress and life but, as it was completely absorbed by the people who experience it, becomes the raw material, the fuel through which the city burns and and builds the present.

Beirut is a city that lives on present, and it’s in the present that it seems to project itself. It’s probably a short-term but, at the same time, very solid projection.
The pursuit of immediate fullness is evident everywhere, in the uninterrupted urban growth, in the economic and cultural boosts and, of course, in the youth-life, constantly in search for emancipation, amusement, fulfillment. There is no doubt that the city (probably the most open-minded city of the Middle East) offers the possibility to satisfy all that.

These images portray everything that stands on the side of this fullness, this burning without wearing out, on the side of parties excesses and nightlife, of daytime progress and development.

The images are part of a broader research about a suspended generation, its choices and outlooks. An intimate research that uses time and space by laying them aside, in the attempt to portray feelings and atmospheres, void and inadequacies, reality and visions.’

“Windy Saddle Park, just outside Denver.
There are some small places around Denver which are good resorts, but there are no objects of interest in the immediate vicinity to drive or ride to, though the roads are good. If city life seems indispensable to the happiness of the invalid, or engaging in business be a necessity, Denver is the best place in Colorado; but even in this pure air man is vile when you get too many of him in a small space.

—A.A. Hayes, Jr., New Colorado and the Santa Fe Trail. 1880”

LBM Dispatch by Alec Soth and Brad Zellar
(via The LBM Dispatch)

Windy Saddle Park, just outside Denver.

There are some small places around Denver which are good resorts, but there are no objects of interest in the immediate vicinity to drive or ride to, though the roads are good. If city life seems indispensable to the happiness of the invalid, or engaging in business be a necessity, Denver is the best place in Colorado; but even in this pure air man is vile when you get too many of him in a small space.

—A.A. Hayes, Jr., New Colorado and the Santa Fe Trail. 1880”

LBM Dispatch by Alec Soth and Brad Zellar

(via The LBM Dispatch)

Castroland by Lasse Bech Martinussen and Jesper Damgaard Lund
(via Castroland | VICE United States)

Castroland by Lasse Bech Martinussen and Jesper Damgaard Lund

(via Castroland | VICE United States)

A billboard of Hasan Nasrallah and the Imad Mughniyah, one of Hezbollah’s most senior commanders, who was assassinated in 2008, adorns a house overlooking the town of Bint Jbeil, a Hezbollah stronghold.
(via Slide Show: Moises Saman’s Photographs of Hezbollah)

A billboard of Hasan Nasrallah and the Imad Mughniyah, one of Hezbollah’s most senior commanders, who was assassinated in 2008, adorns a house overlooking the town of Bint Jbeil, a Hezbollah stronghold.

(via Slide Show: Moises Saman’s Photographs of Hezbollah)

Khalwat al-Bayyada

Khalwat al-Bayyada (the white houses of communion) located in southern Lebanon, are know for their special importance to Druze religious learning. They are study halls in which the religion’s priests specialize in the Kutub al-Hikma, reciting them by heart and copying them. There are religious persons who stay there permanently, isolating themselves from the outside world. They live an ascetic and monastic lifestyle and are therefore held in high esteem. Over time, several structures have been built to accommodate religious figures visiting al-Bayyada. 

The Druze in the Middle East: their faith, leadership, identity and status - Nissîm Dānā - Google Bøger

Lebanon Religious Groups Distribution based on data published by Lebanon Demographics
(via Religion in Lebanon - wiki)

Lebanon Religious Groups Distribution based on data published by Lebanon Demographics

(via Religion in Lebanon - wiki)

Photograph of a woman from the Lebanon Mountain from Robert Barr’s ‘The Unchanging East’. 

(via The Dusty Bookcase: Women of the Unchanging East)

Photograph of a woman from the Lebanon Mountain from Robert Barr’s ‘The Unchanging East’.

(via The Dusty Bookcase: Women of the Unchanging East)

Lebanon as envisaged by French General Charles-Marie-Napoléon de Beaufort d’Hautpoul Beaufort d’Hautpoul in 1862 from a comprehensive encyclopedia on Lebanon on digplanet.com.  

(via Learn and talk about Lebanon, Arabic-speaking countries and territories, Countries of the Mediterranean Sea, Eastern Mediterranean countries, Fertile Crescent)

Lebanon as envisaged by French General Charles-Marie-Napoléon de Beaufort d’Hautpoul Beaufort d’Hautpoul in 1862 from a comprehensive encyclopedia on Lebanon on digplanet.com.

(via Learn and talk about Lebanon, Arabic-speaking countries and territories, Countries of the Mediterranean Sea, Eastern Mediterranean countries, Fertile Crescent)

Det gamle træ, o, lad det stå

By Hans Christian Andersen

Det gamle træ, o, lad det stå,
indtil det dør af ælde.
Så mange ting det husker på,
hvad kan det ikke melde.
Vi det så fuldt med blomster så,
de friske grene hælde.
Det gamle træ, o, lad det stå,
det må I ikke fælde!

Nu vil jeg da på vandring gå,
men det kan jeg fornemme,
man rejser ud for hjem at nå,
thi bedst er det dog hjemme.
Når træet her har blomster på,
det vil min hjemkomst melde.
Det gamle træ, o, lad det stå,
det må I ikke fælde!

(via Gamle Danske Sange: Det gamle træ, o, lad det stå)

Hans Christian Andersen : The Fir Tree

English translation of Hans Christians Andersens “Grantræet” by Jean Hersholt.

They stand on uneven ground..

"The stand on uneven ground, and form a small wood. Of the oldest and best looking trees, I counted eleven or twelve; twenty five very large ones; about fifty of middling size; and more than three hundred smaller and young one. The trunks of the old trees are covered with names of travelers and other persons who have visited them. I saw a date of the seventeenth century. The trunks of the oldest trees seem to be quite dead; the wood is of grey tint; I took off a piece of one them; but it was afterwards stolen." 

John Lewis Burkhardt (1784-1817)

(via beirut_gallery : roberto boccaccino)
'On The Side' photo essay by Roberto Boccaccino:
‘ON THE SIDE
People who know or live in Beirut consider it as a place in which a new, and sometimes imminent, conflict is always drawing.
This uncertainty, this faint stability, does not prove to place a check on progress and life but, as it was completely absorbed by the people who experience it, becomes the raw material, the fuel through which the city burns and and builds the present.
Beirut is a city that lives on present, and it’s in the present that it seems to project itself. It’s probably a short-term but, at the same time, very solid projection.The pursuit of immediate fullness is evident everywhere, in the uninterrupted urban growth, in the economic and cultural boosts and, of course, in the youth-life, constantly in search for emancipation, amusement, fulfillment. There is no doubt that the city (probably the most open-minded city of the Middle East) offers the possibility to satisfy all that.
These images portray everything that stands on the side of this fullness, this burning without wearing out, on the side of parties excesses and nightlife, of daytime progress and development.
The images are part of a broader research about a suspended generation, its choices and outlooks. An intimate research that uses time and space by laying them aside, in the attempt to portray feelings and atmospheres, void and inadequacies, reality and visions.’

(via beirut_gallery : roberto boccaccino)

'On The Side' photo essay by Roberto Boccaccino:

ON THE SIDE

People who know or live in Beirut consider it as a place in which a new, and sometimes imminent, conflict is always drawing.

This uncertainty, this faint stability, does not prove to place a check on progress and life but, as it was completely absorbed by the people who experience it, becomes the raw material, the fuel through which the city burns and and builds the present.

Beirut is a city that lives on present, and it’s in the present that it seems to project itself. It’s probably a short-term but, at the same time, very solid projection.
The pursuit of immediate fullness is evident everywhere, in the uninterrupted urban growth, in the economic and cultural boosts and, of course, in the youth-life, constantly in search for emancipation, amusement, fulfillment. There is no doubt that the city (probably the most open-minded city of the Middle East) offers the possibility to satisfy all that.

These images portray everything that stands on the side of this fullness, this burning without wearing out, on the side of parties excesses and nightlife, of daytime progress and development.

The images are part of a broader research about a suspended generation, its choices and outlooks. An intimate research that uses time and space by laying them aside, in the attempt to portray feelings and atmospheres, void and inadequacies, reality and visions.’

“Windy Saddle Park, just outside Denver.
There are some small places around Denver which are good resorts, but there are no objects of interest in the immediate vicinity to drive or ride to, though the roads are good. If city life seems indispensable to the happiness of the invalid, or engaging in business be a necessity, Denver is the best place in Colorado; but even in this pure air man is vile when you get too many of him in a small space.

—A.A. Hayes, Jr., New Colorado and the Santa Fe Trail. 1880”

LBM Dispatch by Alec Soth and Brad Zellar
(via The LBM Dispatch)

Windy Saddle Park, just outside Denver.

There are some small places around Denver which are good resorts, but there are no objects of interest in the immediate vicinity to drive or ride to, though the roads are good. If city life seems indispensable to the happiness of the invalid, or engaging in business be a necessity, Denver is the best place in Colorado; but even in this pure air man is vile when you get too many of him in a small space.

—A.A. Hayes, Jr., New Colorado and the Santa Fe Trail. 1880”

LBM Dispatch by Alec Soth and Brad Zellar

(via The LBM Dispatch)

Castroland by Lasse Bech Martinussen and Jesper Damgaard Lund
(via Castroland | VICE United States)

Castroland by Lasse Bech Martinussen and Jesper Damgaard Lund

(via Castroland | VICE United States)

A billboard of Hasan Nasrallah and the Imad Mughniyah, one of Hezbollah’s most senior commanders, who was assassinated in 2008, adorns a house overlooking the town of Bint Jbeil, a Hezbollah stronghold.
(via Slide Show: Moises Saman’s Photographs of Hezbollah)

A billboard of Hasan Nasrallah and the Imad Mughniyah, one of Hezbollah’s most senior commanders, who was assassinated in 2008, adorns a house overlooking the town of Bint Jbeil, a Hezbollah stronghold.

(via Slide Show: Moises Saman’s Photographs of Hezbollah)

Khalwat al-Bayyada

Khalwat al-Bayyada (the white houses of communion) located in southern Lebanon, are know for their special importance to Druze religious learning. They are study halls in which the religion’s priests specialize in the Kutub al-Hikma, reciting them by heart and copying them. There are religious persons who stay there permanently, isolating themselves from the outside world. They live an ascetic and monastic lifestyle and are therefore held in high esteem. Over time, several structures have been built to accommodate religious figures visiting al-Bayyada. 

The Druze in the Middle East: their faith, leadership, identity and status - Nissîm Dānā - Google Bøger

Lebanon Religious Groups Distribution based on data published by Lebanon Demographics
(via Religion in Lebanon - wiki)

Lebanon Religious Groups Distribution based on data published by Lebanon Demographics

(via Religion in Lebanon - wiki)

Photograph of a woman from the Lebanon Mountain from Robert Barr’s ‘The Unchanging East’. 

(via The Dusty Bookcase: Women of the Unchanging East)

Photograph of a woman from the Lebanon Mountain from Robert Barr’s ‘The Unchanging East’.

(via The Dusty Bookcase: Women of the Unchanging East)

Lebanon as envisaged by French General Charles-Marie-Napoléon de Beaufort d’Hautpoul Beaufort d’Hautpoul in 1862 from a comprehensive encyclopedia on Lebanon on digplanet.com.  

(via Learn and talk about Lebanon, Arabic-speaking countries and territories, Countries of the Mediterranean Sea, Eastern Mediterranean countries, Fertile Crescent)

Lebanon as envisaged by French General Charles-Marie-Napoléon de Beaufort d’Hautpoul Beaufort d’Hautpoul in 1862 from a comprehensive encyclopedia on Lebanon on digplanet.com.

(via Learn and talk about Lebanon, Arabic-speaking countries and territories, Countries of the Mediterranean Sea, Eastern Mediterranean countries, Fertile Crescent)

Det gamle træ, o, lad det stå

By Hans Christian Andersen

Det gamle træ, o, lad det stå,
indtil det dør af ælde.
Så mange ting det husker på,
hvad kan det ikke melde.
Vi det så fuldt med blomster så,
de friske grene hælde.
Det gamle træ, o, lad det stå,
det må I ikke fælde!

Nu vil jeg da på vandring gå,
men det kan jeg fornemme,
man rejser ud for hjem at nå,
thi bedst er det dog hjemme.
Når træet her har blomster på,
det vil min hjemkomst melde.
Det gamle træ, o, lad det stå,
det må I ikke fælde!

(via Gamle Danske Sange: Det gamle træ, o, lad det stå)

Hans Christian Andersen : The Fir Tree

English translation of Hans Christians Andersens “Grantræet” by Jean Hersholt.

They stand on uneven ground..
Khalwat al-Bayyada
Det gamle træ, o, lad det stå

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Cedre Liban is a space where we collect our research for a project on the Lebanese Cedar Tree and its historical significance.

We are Dennis Lehmann and Mie Brinkmann. The content on Cedre Liban belong to the creating artists. If any copyrights are violated, please contact us.